HomeLockedAussie employees divided over next career move

Aussie employees divided over next career move

Aussie employees divided over next career move
It seems Australian employees are divided on whether they want to stay in their current job once the economy stabilizes, or move on.
Robert Walters’ recent Employee Insights Survey (EIS) of over 400 Australian professionals has found that nationally, 49 percent of employees surveyed will be looking to move roles once the economy stabilises and 51 percent will be happy to stay put.
Of those 49 percent looking to move nationally, the majority (31 percent) are motivated by career advancement opportunities, followed by 21 percent seeking a better pay and bonus structure. Only 6 perent were seeking a larger, more stable organisation.  Of those employees looking for a career change, 37 percent are keen to commence their job search within the next two months, while 40 percent are willing to wait until the New Year.
Commenting on the results James Nicholson, Managing Director of Robert Walters, Australia said a downturn is one of the hardest times to motivate staff, yet is one of the most important.
“Companies should have clear retention strategies in place to ensure they keep hold of their top talent – the market will turn once again and companies who have fought to retain their top talent will be ahead of the game,” he said.

It seems Australian employees are divided on whether they want to stay in their current job once the economy stabilises, or move on.

Robert Walters’ recent Employee Insights Survey (EIS) of over 400 Australian professionals found that nationally, 49 percent will be looking to move roles once the economy stabilises and 51 percent will be happy to stay put.

Of those 49 percent looking to move nationally, the majority (31 percent) are motivated by career advancement opportunities, followed by 21 percent seeking a better pay and bonus structure. Only six perent were seeking a larger, more stable organisation. Of those employees looking for a career change, 37 percent are keen to commence their job search within the next two months, while 40 percent are willing to wait until the New Year.

Commenting on the results James Nicholson, managing director of Robert Walters, Australia said a downturn is one of the hardest times to motivate staff, yet is one of the most important.

“Companies should have clear retention strategies in place to ensure they keep hold of their top talent – the market will turn once again and companies who have fought to retain their top talent will be ahead of the game,” he said.

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Jessica Stanichttp://www.dynamicbusiness.com.au
Jessica has a background in both marketing and journalism and is dedicated to making the website the leading online resource for small to medium businesses with ambitions to grow.