How video content helps to cut through growing online competition 


Petra O’Halloran on online video content for brands and their consumers

Petra O’Halloran, Creative Research Project Manager at iStock by Getty Images.

Tech

By Petra O'Halloran

For years, video content has become more and more popular with online consumers. Brands have responded by using video to drive engagement, whether on Instagram, Facebook Live or even LinkedIn’s new Stories feature. Now, as many SMBs pivot to a largely online presence, video is an important consideration for anyone looking to stand out in a fast-growing crowd.  

As Creative Research Project Manager for iStock at Getty Images, I keep abreast of all the latest trends in visual content and monitor which types of videos resonate the most with consumers. Video can quickly capture your audience’s attention and get your product or service on their radar but, with so many other businesses increasingly focused on their digital presence, it’s important to consider which kinds of video content are most likely to perform. 

Currently, the content which resonates best with consumers centres on the topics of wellness, technology and food/beverage. Read on and I’ll explain why, along with how you too can leverage video content in these categories to help build your brand and connect with your customers 

Wellness: the need for self-care  

Aussies are looking to take care of themselves, both physically and emotionally. Areas that sit under the wellness umbrella, like fitness and home work-outs, are all rising in popularity. You only need to look at the world-wide popularity of the daily Joe Wicks exercise videos to see that fitness especially fitness sans gyms has become a key area of focus. 

Of course, wellness doesn’t just stop at fitness. Mental wellness and emotional wellbeing are getting extra attention, too. Australians are increasingly turning to activities that can relax them or provide a healthy outlet for pent-up energy think meditating or knitting. For similar reasons, they’re also looking to connect with others through games, gifts or even creative communications like signs or messages visible from windows. 

To position your product or service, think about how wellness might align with your brand. How can your brand or products support Australian consumers who are trying to look after themselves? Can your product or service help someone stay fit or entertain cooped-up kids? Can they help family members somehow connect from long distances, or people looking to explore a new hobby? These needs are top of mind for many right now, so content that speaks to them can allow you to deepen relationships with existing customers and start relationships with new ones. 

Technology: Helping us stay connected  

Before winter fully sets in, Australians are used to spending their free time by making the most of the mild weather and getting together with friends and family. Now, as life shifts indoors, they’re reconfiguring what their free time looks like and, usually, that involves technology in some way.   

Viewership trends show that media consumption is higher than ever, with Netflix and Xbox seeing a surge in users and viewing hours.  Internet usage is also up, with people messaging and video chatting friends and loved ones more than ever before. With so many more eyeballs online, this is the perfect time for business owners to develop creative branded content that can foster the connection users crave 

Using video content around this topic is an effective way for SMBs to demonstrate that they’re continuously communicating and reaching out to their customer base. Showing the human element of technology, as well as how brands are using it to connect with consumers, reminds customers that a business is committed to keeping them updated, connected and feeling supported.  

Food and beverage: Leave your customers hungry for more  

Satisfy your audience’s hunger for everything gourmand with food and food-related clips. The rise of food blogs and foodie content over the past several years has garnered a big audience for cooking-related content. That’s especially true for the Australians who have more time to experiment with cooking and get creative with food in their own homes. 

Food and beverage is a huge customer segment that you don’t want to miss out on. Food can evoke feelings of comfort and sensory delight. Exploring food presentation, the joy of dining at home or practical instructions for cooking meals are all different ways of meeting your audience’s creative appetite. Videos showing interesting new snacks work equally well as niche food topics, like howto videos providing tips for canning or pickling foods.  

Whichever category best fits your brand, these three types of content carry a dual benefit: they’re timely right now but have a proven history of popularity regardless of season or circumstances. So their shelf lives may be longer than other types of video content. 

Creating an emotional connection with your audience is key to building your brand and driving better engagement, and branded video content is one of the quickest ways to do that online.    


Petra O’Halloran is Creative Research Project Manager at iStock by Getty Images.

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